Newsletter Issues

2018

Summer 2018 (#131) pdf
Summer 2018 (#131) web
Spring 2018 (#130) pdf
Spring 2018 (#130) web

2017

Winter 2017-18 (#129) pdf
Winter 2017-18 (#129) web
Fall 2017 (#128) pdf
Fall 2017 (#128) web
Summer 2017(#127) pdf
Summer 2017 (#127) web
Spring 2017 (#126) pdf
Spring 2017 (#126) web

2016

Winter 2016 (#125) pdf
Winter 2016 (#125) web
Fall 2016 (#124) pdf
Fall 2016 (#124) web
Summer 2016 (#123) pdf
Summer 2016 (#123) web
Spring 2016 (#122) pdf
Spring 2016 (#122) web

2015

Winter 2015 (#121) pdf
Winter 2015 (#121) web
Fall 2015 (#120) pdf
Fall 2015 (#120) web
Summer 2015 (#119) pdf
Summer 2015 (#119) web
Spring 2015 (#118) pdf
Spring 2015 (#118) web

2014

Winter 2014 (#117) pdf
Winter 2014 (#117) web
Fall 2014 (#116) pdf
Fall 2014 (#116) web
Summer 2014 (#115) pdf
Summer 2014 (#115) web
Spring 2014 (#114) pdf
Spring 2014 (#114) web

2013

Winter 2013-14 (#113) pdf
Winter 2013-14 (#113) web
Fall 2013 (#112) pdf
Fall 2013 (#112) web
Summer 2013 (#111) pdf
Summer 2013 (#111) web
Spring 2013 (#110) pdf
Spring 2013 (#110) web

2012

Winter 2012 - 13 (#109) pdf
Winter 2012 -13 (#109) web
Fall 2012 (#108) pdf
Fall 2012 (#108) web
Summer 2012 (#107)
Spring 2012 (#106)

2011

Winter 2011 - 12 (#105)
Fall 2011 (#104)
Summer 2011 (#103)
Spring 2011 (#102)

2010

Winter 2010 - 11 (#101)
Fall 2010 (#100)
Summer 2010 (#99)
Spring 2010 (#98)

2009

Winter 2009 - 10 (#97)
Fall 2009 (#96)
Summer 2009 (#95)
Spring 2009 (#94)

2008

Winter 2008 - 09 (#93)
Fall 2008 (#92)
Summer 2008 (#91)
Spring 2008 (#90)

2007

Winter 2007 - 08 (#89)
Fall 2007 (#88)
Summer 2007 (#87)
Spring 2007 (#86)

2006

Winter 2006 - 07 (#85)
Fall 2006 (#84)
Summer 2006 (#83)
Spring 2006 (#82)

2005

Winter 2005 - 06 (#81)
Fall 2005 (#80)
Summer 2005 (#79)
Spring 2005 (#78)

2004

Winter 2004 - 05 (#77)
Fall 2004 (#76)
Summer 2004 (#75)
Spring 2004 (#74)

2003

Winter 2003 - 04 (#73)
Fall 2003 (#72)
Summer 2003 (#71)
Spring 2003 (#70)

2002

Winter 2002-03 (#69)
Fall 2002 (#68)
Summer 2002 (#67)
Spring 2002 (#66)

2001

Winter 2001 - 02 (#65)
Fall 2001 (#64)
Summer 2001 (#63)
Spring 2001 (#62)

2000

Winter 2000 - 01 (#61)
Fall 2000 (#60)
Summer 2000 (#59)
Spring 2000 (#58)

1999

Winter 1999 - 00 (#57)
Fall 1999 (#56)
Summer 1999 (#55)
Spring 1999 (#54)

 

Image says Accessability - graphic in grey for Access and green for Ability with dove in grey on newpaper that says Extra! Extra! Read all about it.

 

Reflections

by Maria Dibble

Southern Tier Independence Center (STIC) is celebrating our 35th. anniversary this year.

As I reflect back on my 35 years as Executive Director, I’m struck by how much we’ve accomplished, how much we’ve grown, and how much change we’ve helped to bring about through advocacy.

We began with a staff of four in 1983, and in 2018 we employ approximately 800 individuals.

We served very few people in our first year as we were working hard to spread the word about STIC, while as of October 31, 2017 (the last full year of data), we provided services to more than 4,300 people. This includes people with disabilities, family members, medical and service professionals, and more...

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State Budget Decisions: What Does It All Mean, Anyway?

Now that most of the screaming and flailing about over what, to most people, seemed like really obscure details concerning managed care in the budget debate is over, we’d like to take a little time to explain what it was all about, and why you should care.

One of the reasons why managed care is touted as cutting medical costs is its alleged ability to prevent people from getting sicker. If you have people looking over your entire life situation regularly, identifying health risks and providing relatively inexpensive preventive measures, supposedly you won’t need so many costly tests, medications, and surgeries later on. Plus, you’ll feel better and be able to do more.

There is truth in this, and there are many medical professionals and kind-hearted progressive people who believe it...

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Shocking Protests

This past March, and again in May, dozens of ADAPT activists staged a series of sit-in protests in Washington, DC to try to get the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to issue a ban on the use of electric shock punishment devices on people with disabilities.

As we reported a couple years ago (see AccessAbility Summer 2016), the FDA was requesting input on new regulations to do just that. The agency received thousands of responses (including ours), nearly all of which strongly supported a ban. About the only comments opposing the ban were from the Judge Rotenberg Center, a private institution in Massachusetts that is the only known program that uses the devices, and from a handful of parents who have been deluded into believing, despite a barrage of scientific evidence to the contrary, that the devices are the only thing that can keep their children from engaging in harmful behavior.

About six years ago, Massachusetts regulators succeeded in restricting use of the devices to a “grandfathered” set of Rotenberg residents whose parents obtained court orders to continue the “treatments.” Around the same time, the facility’s founder, Israel Rotenberg, was convicted of lying to a grand jury about how the treatments were administered...

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Summer 2018 Issue No. 131 - web site version

Summer 2018 Issue No. 131 - pdf version