Newsletter Issues

2017

Spring 2017 (#126) pdf
Spring 2017 (#126) web

2016

Winter 2016 (#125) pdf
Winter 2016 (#125) web
Fall 2016 (#124) pdf
Fall 2016 (#124) web
Summer 2016 (#123) pdf
Summer 2016 (#123) web
Spring 2016 pdf (#122)
Spring 2016 (#122) web

2015

Winter 2015 (#121) pdf
Winter 2015 (#121) web
Fall 2015 (#120) pdf
Fall 2015 (#120) web
Summer 2015 (#119) pdf
Summer 2015 (#119) web
Spring 2015 (#118) pdf
Spring 2015 (#118) web

2014

Winter 2014 (#117) pdf
Winter 2014 (#117) web
Fall 2014 (#116) pdf
Fall 2014 (#116) web
Summer 2014 (#115) pdf
Summer 2014 (#115) web
Spring 2014 (#114) pdf
Spring 2014 (#114) web

2013

Winter 2013 - 14 (#113) pdf
Winter 2013 - 14 (#113) web
Fall 2013 (#112) pdf
Fall 2013 (#112) web
Summer 2013 (#111) pdf
Summer 2013 (#111) web
Spring 2013 (#110) pdf
Spring 2013 (#110) web

2012

Winter 2012 - 13 (#109) pdf
Winter 2012 - 13 (#109) web
Fall 2012 (#108) pdf
Fall 2012 (#108) web
Summer 2012 (#107)
Spring 2012 (#106)

2011

Winter 2011 - 12 (#105)
Fall 2011 (#104)
Summer 2011 (#103)
Spring 2011 (#102)

2010

Winter 2010 - 11 (#101)
Fall 2010 (#100)
Summer 2010 (#99)
Spring 2010 (#98)

2009

Winter 2009 - 10 (#97)
Fall 2009 (#96)
Summer 2009 (#95)
Spring 2009 (#94)

2008

Winter 2008 - 09 (#93)
Fall 2008 (#92)
Summer 2008 (#91)
Spring 2008 (#90)

2007

Winter 2007 - 08 (#89)
Fall 2007 (#88)
Summer 2007 (#87)
Spring 2007 (#86)

2006

Winter 2006 - 07 (#85)
Fall 2006 (#84)
Summer 2006 (#83)
Spring 2006 (#82)

2005

Winter 2005 - 06 (#81)
Fall 2005 (#80)
Summer 2005 (#79)
Spring 2005 (#78)

2004

Winter 2004 - 05 (#77)
Fall 2004 (#76)
Summer 2004 (#75)
Spring 2004 (#74)

2003

Winter 2003 - 04 (#73)
Fall 2003 (#72)
Summer 2003 (#71)
Spring 2003 (#70)

2002

Winter 2002-03 (#69)
Fall 2002 (#68)
Summer 2002 (#67)
Spring 2002 (#66)

2001

Winter 2001 - 02 (#65)
Fall 2001 (#64)
Summer 2001 (#63)
Spring 2001 (#62)

2000

Winter 2000 - 01 (#61)
Fall 2000 (#60)
Summer 2000 (#59)
Spring 2000 (#58)

1999

Winter 1999 - 00 (#57)
Fall 1999 (#56)
Summer 1999 (#55)
Spring 1999 (#54)

 

Image says Accessability - graphic in grey for Access and green for Ability with dove in grey on newpaper that says Extra! Extra! Read all about it.

 

Thanks a Lot, Richard Nixon

by Ken Dibble

That’s right, Richard Nixon. He of the double V-for-victory gesture, his wife’s “respectable Republican cloth coat”, and his daughter’s little dog Checkers too. He of the mining of Haiphong Harbor, the secret war in Cambodia, and the fostering of the war crimes of Henry Kissinger. Richard Nixon of Watergate, who went on national TV to say he was “not a crook”.

Well, he was a crook, as conclusively demonstrated by the trials and convictions of his henchmen, and by the books they wrote later. As journalist Hunter Thompson said, Nixon was “so crooked he had to screw his pants on in the morning.”

So what’s this got to do with disability? Nixon’s only alleged disability was alcoholism—but really, he was a functional drunk so he doesn’t fit the clinical definition. (Hunter Thompson was clearly mentally ill, too, but, again, functional, and absolutely right most of the time as well.)...

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That Big Long Annual Budget Article Again

Yep, it’s that time of year, when the sun returns, a hundred crocuses bloom, and we can hear the happy trickling of snow-melt running through the creeks, along with the whooshing of gasbags in Albany and the steady clink-clink-clink of coins being transferred from the budgets of not-for-profit agencies into the coffers of for-profit medical insurance companies. It’s spring!

There’s lots of bad news, and some good news, in Governor Cuomo’s budget-season proposals this year. But one of the most interesting concerns possible fallout from the inauguration of the new Trump Administration.

Although Trump has occasionally tweeted that he has no interest in cutting Social Security, Medicare, or Medicaid, the Republican-controlled Congress has gained courage from the election of a Republican president who won’t necessarily veto any such cuts that they choose to make. So they have resurrected a long-cherished idea first brought forth during the Reagan Administration: Medicaid block grants. (We explained what these are in our editorial last time; see AccessAbility Winter ’16-’17.) This, along with Trump’s clearly-stated intent to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare), whose Medicaid expansion provisions have brought a lot of money into New York, would seem to pose a substantial threat to the state’s budget...

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Congress Blocks Gun Regulations

That headline is no surprise. However, this particular event concerns regulations issued by the Social Security Administration last year to enforce federal law that prohibits people who have been “adjudicated mentally defective” from owning firearms.

To understand this we first have to get past our distaste for that language. What it really means is, if someone has a mental health, cognitive, or developmental disability that is severe enough that s/he has been formally found, by due legal process, to be incapable of managing his/her own affairs, then s/he cannot have a gun...

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Spring 2017 Issue No. 126 - web site version

Spring 2017 Issue No. 126 - pdf version