Newsletter Issues

2017

Winter 2017 (#129) pdf
Winter 2017 (#129) web
Fall 2017 (#128) pdf
Fall 2017 (#128) web
Summer 2017(#127) pdf
Summer 2017 (#127) web
Spring 2017 (#126) pdf
Spring 2017 (#126) web

2016

Winter 2016 (#125) pdf
Winter 2016 (#125) web
Fall 2016 (#124) pdf
Fall 2016 (#124) web
Summer 2016 (#123) pdf
Summer 2016 (#123) web
Spring 2016 (#122) pdf
Spring 2016 (#122) web

2015

Winter 2015 (#121) pdf
Winter 2015 (#121) web
Fall 2015 (#120) pdf
Fall 2015 (#120) web
Summer 2015 (#119) pdf
Summer 2015 (#119) web
Spring 2015 (#118) pdf
Spring 2015 (#118) web

2014

Winter 2014 (#117) pdf
Winter 2014 (#117) web
Fall 2014 (#116) pdf
Fall 2014 (#116) web
Summer 2014 (#115) pdf
Summer 2014 (#115) web
Spring 2014 (#114) pdf
Spring 2014 (#114) web

2013

Winter 2013 - 14 (#113) pdf
Winter 2013 - 14 (#113) web
Fall 2013 (#112) pdf
Fall 2013 (#112) web
Summer 2013 (#111) pdf
Summer 2013 (#111) web
Spring 2013 (#110) pdf
Spring 2013 (#110) web

2012

Winter 2012 - 13 (#109) pdf
Winter 2012 - 13 (#109) web
Fall 2012 (#108) pdf
Fall 2012 (#108) web
Summer 2012 (#107)
Spring 2012 (#106)

2011

Winter 2011 - 12 (#105)
Fall 2011 (#104)
Summer 2011 (#103)
Spring 2011 (#102)

2010

Winter 2010 - 11 (#101)
Fall 2010 (#100)
Summer 2010 (#99)
Spring 2010 (#98)

2009

Winter 2009 - 10 (#97)
Fall 2009 (#96)
Summer 2009 (#95)
Spring 2009 (#94)

2008

Winter 2008 - 09 (#93)
Fall 2008 (#92)
Summer 2008 (#91)
Spring 2008 (#90)

2007

Winter 2007 - 08 (#89)
Fall 2007 (#88)
Summer 2007 (#87)
Spring 2007 (#86)

2006

Winter 2006 - 07 (#85)
Fall 2006 (#84)
Summer 2006 (#83)
Spring 2006 (#82)

2005

Winter 2005 - 06 (#81)
Fall 2005 (#80)
Summer 2005 (#79)
Spring 2005 (#78)

2004

Winter 2004 - 05 (#77)
Fall 2004 (#76)
Summer 2004 (#75)
Spring 2004 (#74)

2003

Winter 2003 - 04 (#73)
Fall 2003 (#72)
Summer 2003 (#71)
Spring 2003 (#70)

2002

Winter 2002-03 (#69)
Fall 2002 (#68)
Summer 2002 (#67)
Spring 2002 (#66)

2001

Winter 2001 - 02 (#65)
Fall 2001 (#64)
Summer 2001 (#63)
Spring 2001 (#62)

2000

Winter 2000 - 01 (#61)
Fall 2000 (#60)
Summer 2000 (#59)
Spring 2000 (#58)

1999

Winter 1999 - 00 (#57)
Fall 1999 (#56)
Summer 1999 (#55)
Spring 1999 (#54)

 

Image says Accessability - graphic in grey for Access and green for Ability with dove in grey on newpaper that says Extra! Extra! Read all about it.

 

The Last Catch - 22

by Ken Dibble

Here’s a conundrum of modern life for people who are elderly and disabled:

Suppose you don’t want to live in a nursing facility. That’s pretty much like saying, suppose you want to breathe. But it’s worthwhile elaborating just a bit on this.

If you are starting to need some help, and you don’t mind the idea of moving somewhere that is not your home and not fully under your control, and you have a lot of money, you may be able to get into a pretty upscale place. You know, one of those “senior communities” that can provide flexible levels of services and supports, so that the setting slowly morphs into “assisted living” and then gradually ramps up the hours of personal care and nursing visits as your needs increase, while you continue to live in a very nice little apartment. The staff are reasonably well-paid, well-trained, courteous and respectful, and it may be “just a fantastic place to be,” as an elderly gentleman has recently been telling us on local TV commercials....

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Healthcare Scares

There is little hard news to report about Trump Administration or Congressional action on the disability healthcare front. There’s been a lot of speculation and political posturing, of course.

The available funds do affect federal healthcare programs. Congress has passed a “budget” for the current federal fiscal year, but a federal budget bill is loosely binding. What really matters are the separate appropriations bills, which authorize the actual spending of money. They can differ radically from what’s in the budget. At press time no such bills had been passed, but there were some “continuing resolutions” in effect to keep the government running. Also at press time Congress was facing a self-imposed deadline to get a tax-cut bill to Trump before Christmas.

As of now, nothing is “for sure,” but one thing we do know is that right-wingers want to weaken the federal government’s power to keep people from treating each other badly when that might conflict with their beliefs about religion, gender, or race, or when it might cost them money...

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Don't Spare the Rod

by Bill Bartlow

“Everybody has to have a hometown, Binghamton’s mine. In the strangely brittle, terribly sensitive make-up of a human being, there is a need for a place to hang a hat or a kind of geographical womb to crawl back into, or maybe just a place that’s familiar because that’s where you grew up..."

STIC is proud to announce that in conjunction with the Rod Serling Memorial Foundation, we are designing our third escape room: “TWILIGHT ZONE: The Rod Serling Experience.” The rights to use “Twilight Zone” have been graciously granted by CBS at the urging of Andrew Polak, President of the foundation’s board of directors, and the intercession of Anne (Serling) Sutton, board member and Rod’s daughter. A special thanks to them for their effective efforts...

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Winter 2017 Issue No. 129 - web site version

Winter 2017 Issue No. 129 - pdf version