Newsletter Issues

2018

Fall 2018 (#132) pdf
Fall 2018 (#132) web
Summer 2018 (#131) pdf
Summer 2018 (#131) web
Spring 2018 (#130) pdf
Spring 2018 (#130) web

2017

Winter 2017-18 (#129) pdf
Winter 2017-18 (#129) web
Fall 2017 (#128) pdf
Fall 2017 (#128) web
Summer 2017(#127) pdf
Summer 2017 (#127) web
Spring 2017 (#126) pdf
Spring 2017 (#126) web

2016

Winter 2016 (#125) pdf
Winter 2016 (#125) web
Fall 2016 (#124) pdf
Fall 2016 (#124) web
Summer 2016 (#123) pdf
Summer 2016 (#123) web
Spring 2016 (#122) pdf
Spring 2016 (#122) web

2015

Winter 2015 (#121) pdf
Winter 2015 (#121) web
Fall 2015 (#120) pdf
Fall 2015 (#120) web
Summer 2015 (#119) pdf
Summer 2015 (#119) web
Spring 2015 (#118) pdf
Spring 2015 (#118) web

2014

Winter 2014 (#117) pdf
Winter 2014 (#117) web
Fall 2014 (#116) pdf
Fall 2014 (#116) web
Summer 2014 (#115) pdf
Summer 2014 (#115) web
Spring 2014 (#114) pdf
Spring 2014 (#114) web

2013

Winter 2013-14 (#113) pdf
Winter 2013-14 (#113) web
Fall 2013 (#112) pdf
Fall 2013 (#112) web
Summer 2013 (#111) pdf
Summer 2013 (#111) web
Spring 2013 (#110) pdf
Spring 2013 (#110) web

2012

Winter 2012 - 13 (#109) pdf
Winter 2012 -13 (#109) web
Fall 2012 (#108) pdf
Fall 2012 (#108) web
Summer 2012 (#107)
Spring 2012 (#106)

2011

Winter 2011 - 12 (#105)
Fall 2011 (#104)
Summer 2011 (#103)
Spring 2011 (#102)

2010

Winter 2010 - 11 (#101)
Fall 2010 (#100)
Summer 2010 (#99)
Spring 2010 (#98)

2009

Winter 2009 - 10 (#97)
Fall 2009 (#96)
Summer 2009 (#95)
Spring 2009 (#94)

2008

Winter 2008 - 09 (#93)
Fall 2008 (#92)
Summer 2008 (#91)
Spring 2008 (#90)

2007

Winter 2007 - 08 (#89)
Fall 2007 (#88)
Summer 2007 (#87)
Spring 2007 (#86)

2006

Winter 2006 - 07 (#85)
Fall 2006 (#84)
Summer 2006 (#83)
Spring 2006 (#82)

2005

Winter 2005 - 06 (#81)
Fall 2005 (#80)
Summer 2005 (#79)
Spring 2005 (#78)

2004

Winter 2004 - 05 (#77)
Fall 2004 (#76)
Summer 2004 (#75)
Spring 2004 (#74)

2003

Winter 2003 - 04 (#73)
Fall 2003 (#72)
Summer 2003 (#71)
Spring 2003 (#70)

2002

Winter 2002-03 (#69)
Fall 2002 (#68)
Summer 2002 (#67)
Spring 2002 (#66)

2001

Winter 2001 - 02 (#65)
Fall 2001 (#64)
Summer 2001 (#63)
Spring 2001 (#62)

2000

Winter 2000 - 01 (#61)
Fall 2000 (#60)
Summer 2000 (#59)
Spring 2000 (#58)

1999

Winter 1999 - 00 (#57)
Fall 1999 (#56)
Summer 1999 (#55)
Spring 1999 (#54)

 

Image says Accessability - graphic in grey for Access and green for Ability with dove in grey on newpaper that says Extra! Extra! Read all about it.

 

Why Vote?

by Maria Dibble

It is once again close to that time when Americans get to choose those public officials who will represent them. Yet Americans generally don’t turn out in very large numbers to exercise this most precious of rights, especially in a mid-term election.

I’ve heard so many say, “Why should I vote? Politicians are all the same and it’s a waste of my time.” Except, they aren’t all the same.

As people with disabilities we should really get that message. Some Congressional representatives support many of our issues, such as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); equal employment; Medicaid and other forms of affordable health insurance; ending payment of sub-minimum wage to people with disabilities; and full integration into our communities...

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Judge Kavanaugh: A Thoroughly Dangerous Man

Disability rights advocates have numerous concerns about Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump’s nominee to fill the US Supreme Court seat vacated by Anthony Kennedy. Kavanaugh is currently a federal Circuit Court judge in the DC circuit.

Those concerns were summarized in a report from the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, a broadly respected and authoritative national disability rights organization. We present some of those concerns here, because we believe they are legitimate and very serious. (The report also paints other issues with too broad a brush, criticizing rulings that went badly for people with disabilities for reasons other than the fact that they were disabled, a kind of reasoning that too many overzealous advocates indulge in.)

We also have to report that the Senate has vowed to begin confirmation hearings in early September, before this newsletter will appear, and that there are probably already enough Senate votes, including some Democrats who are running for re-election in conservative states, to confirm him...

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Anniversary Waltz

by Maria Dibble

Thirty-five years sounds like a long time, but it seems to have gone by in the blink of an eye. I began working for STIC on June 27, 1983, and here I am in 2018, still loving my job, still challenging those that would deny us our independence, still fighting the good fight, and still cheering on STIC.

Coral was the color, and tropical island was the theme, as STIC celebrated its 35th. anniversary on July 26, the same date as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)’s 28th. birthday, which was no accident.

We dreaded that all of our efforts to plan, prepare, and set up would be drowned out by rain, since that was the weather for most of the week, as it has been for much of the summer, but our luck held, and the day dawned with a promise of sun and high temperatures.

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Twilight Zone: Binghamton’s Rod Serling Experience Opens that Floating Door

by Bill Bartlow

Since its opening on June 15 the Twilight Zone escape room has been a stellar attraction with an amazing number of teams taking the challenge of solving its puzzles. In fact, before the end of the month we had 146 people enter “The Zone”. It is totally appropriate that the only CBS-approved Twilight Zone escape room in the country should be located in Binghamton, Rod Serling’s hometown. Many area residents are avid fans of the Twilight Zone series and are excited to enter the dimensions of sight, sound and mind that constitute the Zone experience...

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Fall 2018 Issue No. 132 - web site version

Fall 2018 Issue No. 132 - pdf version